Dodge Dakota Based IFS

This is the place for all Dodge Dakota based IFS information. Here you will find projects new and old as well as the old installation instructions from our kits, hints and tips on alignment and how to get the most of your Dakota based installation. This page is a work in progress, check back regularly for updates.

1957-1960 Ford F100 Dodge Dakota Kit

The old instruction sheets

One of those things that was difficult to do before, now here is what I have. If I can find more, I will post them.

Here is a list of the old instruction sheets in PDF form

47-55 GM Truck Dakota Kit Installation

1955-59 Chevy Truck Dakota Kit installation

53-56 Ford F100 Dakota Kit Installation

 

 Why the Dakota IFS

 We chose the Dodge Dakota IFS back in 1991 because of a few things, first was familiarity. I knew four people personally with them and had good practical driving experience with the trucks. I really enjoyed how good the were to drive compared to the other small(er) platform trucks on the market. The Mazda, Toyota and Nissan trucks drove very well, but practically they would not have been good candidates for the classic truck market because they were a bit small and not American Made. The Dakota was, and it was the first of any pickup to have a rack-and-pinion steering! The track width is the same or close to the same as most classic trucks. It’s a full 1/2 ton truck front end and can withstand truck like abuse. It handles good and with an improved anti-roll bar and high quality shock it handles very well also. 

The Viper connection

The Dakota shared it’s platform with the first generation Dodge Viper, some of the parts are interchangeable if not a bit impractical to do so. We have had a customer use a set of Early Viper spindles and brakes on his kit. If you are familiar with the Dakota and the dropped spindles available for it, the Viper spindles will look similar. The rack-and-pinons are interchangeable, beyond that maybe the upper control arms and not much else.

Brake interchanges

The D series full size trucks also have some interchangeability. The brakes to be specific. The 1974 through 1985 D series full size trucks shared the same spindle upright and ball joints as the Dakotas so naturally there is a ton of interchangeability there.  Chrysler used the same ball joints, the K778 Upper ball joint from the 50’s up on full sized cars through the 1 ton truck. The same goes for the lower ball joint, K7025. www.rockauto.com has them listed as of 09/04/2014 for under $10.00 each! The brake rotors all use the same bearing sets and seals, what you will need is a set of caliper brackets that matches the brake rotor and caliper you intend on using. We will be offering caliper brackets for aftermarket calipers such as the Wilwood D52 dual piston caliper.

Pictured is the Dodge Dakota spindle with a Dodge D150 brake rotor and a Wilwood D52 dual piston caliper mounted with the bracket I designed and made. These are the biggest D52 calipers Wilwood makes with two 2" dia. pistons. It doesn't do any good for a hot rod to go fast, if you can't stop. And with the planned diesel engine, the more brakes the better. I designed the bracket. Industrial Chassis cut them out with their plasma cutting service and I drilled and tapped the holes.

Courtesy of our friend Phil Maynard

The patterns and track widths

 The Dakotas by this interchangeability have a large range of bolt patterns available.

1987-1990 – the 10.5″  X 0.870″ rotor. In Dakota lingo it is known as the 14″ wheel rotor. This rotor has a 5 on 4.5″ bolt patten with 1/2-20 studs and will narrow the track width to 59.5″. You will need the correct caliper bracket for this rotor but the caliper itself is the same for all the Dakotas from 1987-1990.

1987-1990 – the 11.375″ X 0.870″ rotor. In Dakota lingo it is know as the 15″ wheel rotor. This rotor has a 5 on 4.5″ bolt pattern with 1/2-20 studs and has a track width of 61″. If you purchased a complete front end, most likely these will be the standard brakes. Calipers have the brake hose nearest the spindle and have a different profile to the brake pads between the inner and outer. Calipers can be used on the later caliper bracket with the later brake pads.

1991-1996 – the 11.375″ X 0.890″ rotor. First years of the odd 6 lug pattern. It is a 6 on 4.5″ pattern, the same as the Dodge Viper and nothing else. If you buy a front end with this rotor on it, the earlier rotors are a direct bolt on. The calipers and brackets are different from the earlier trucks. The brake pads have the same profile for the inner and outer. The caliper is also different by the location of the brake hose on the outside nearest the wheel. Calipers can be used on the earlier caliper brackets with the earlier brake pads.

Dropped spindles and Brake interchanges

Dropped spindle and tie rod drop

There were several manufacturers of dropped spindles for the 1986-1996 Dodge Dakota. All came from a master pattern that we believe was actually derived from the D150 Dodge full size trucks developed by BellTech. Now there appears to be only two, the new BellTech and Airbagit.com. Airbagit is still using the older style spindle and we prefer it for a couple of reasons.

The dropped spindles have an artifact we found about the steering arms. They are in the incorrect position and do induce a bumpsteer not present with the stock Dakota spindles. We developed this tie rod end drop kit to resolve the issue. The kit is $161.50 and includes high strength HIEM joints with dust boots and Grade 8 Zinc plated hardware. Please call to order, we will need to know what rack-and-pinion you have. We prefer you purchase spindles for the 1987-1990 Dakota regardless of what year rack you have. See below.

We have found that if you use the BellTech spindles, you are limited to the stock Dakota rotors. The D-series truck rotors will hit the tie rod. BellTech has not only raised and shortened the steering arm, but now have moved it outboard. This has caused an interference issue, we have not had this issue with the spindles from Airbagit. 

 The rendering in this PDF file is a three dimensional image. Click the image in the downloaded PDF file one time and let your computer do it’s thing. Once rendered you can click on the image and rotate it around to see how the conversion is done.

Dropped Dakota spindle tie rod drop

The Rack and Pinions

There are a few ratios available and there are even non-assisted racks. To keep it simple, the earlier 1987-1990 Dakota trucks have a 14mm X 1.5 thread pitch on the tie rods and have a smaller stud and nut on the tie rod end requiring a 3/4″ wrench. The 1991-1996 Dakota trucks have a 15mm X 1.5 thread on the tie rods and a larger stud and nut on the tie rod ends requiring a 7/8″ wrench. There does not appear to be a strength issue with either, I suspect this had to do with the Viper connection more than anything else. If you are going to mix and match parts, be aware that your rack and spindles must match. If you are using dropped spindles and have a 1990-1996 Dakota donor, we recommend you use the 1987-1990 spindles as the bore for the tie rod end is smaller. You will need to drill out the steering arm to 5/8″ for the tie rod drop. If you have the 1991-1996 spindle, the tie rod bore is larger than 5/8″ and could cause issue.